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A reinvention of the solo show. Through not showing any Robert Barry works in a Robert Barry solo show, authorship and control, the things so avidly investigated and so articulated expressed originally by Barry, pass back onto the curator. The curator pretends to be the solo artist, alongside the group of participating artists pretending to be the solo artist. The solo artist is still the solo artist. Six curators, one artist, one gallery, three weeks. The focus of Notes for an Exhibition was a move away from methods of teleological exhibition-making toward action, response and production, with an emphasis on collaboration and discussion, association and conversation.

I invited in the curators with a proposal: They therefore selected Desmond Church, who is an artist who works with proposals and propositional-based work. He would send the curators three separate proposals per week over three weeks, which the curators would then translate into works.

There was an events programme curated by Limbo neighbouring art space. Four events — a t-shirt sale, a talk, a gig then a screening — occured throughout the timescale of the exhibition, physically and conceptually shifting the exhibition continually, each event leaving a short-term legacy on the spatial framework before the next.

So before each event we would make way for it, by moving and repositioning artworks. After the event, the artworks remained in place, they were not moved back, so allowing for a kind of physical legacy of what had happened each time, shifting the exhibition radically from beginning to end.

The show was not about Punk-rock. More over, the 3 minute punk-rock song was used as a framework in which to align certain artworks and artists together. The works dealt with errors, spasms, glorious hiccups and splutters, reminiscent of our everyday stumblings. They dealt with a certain kind of generosity; a generosity of quickness, urgency, interruption and blurring.

It was a project that concentrated on collaborative working processes, focusing on research and discussion as major factors in the art-making process, rather than making and showing. It attempted to unravel working and thinking and push these often hidden processes public.

This lead to A Way of Doing Things , where notions of the natural evolution of ideas and things become secondary to pragmatism and a sense of wanting to get things done. A Way of Doing Things was a reference point for discussion and thinking, which moved on to form something else. So Event Show began with an idea that the artists involved could maybe use The Way Things Go as an analogy and a model for practice and art-making. Rather than simply seeing TWTG as a film to be consumed and enjoyed, is it more interesting to use it as a tool in order to make new work from?

My suggestion was based on the notion of replacing the objects in the film binbags, tyres, models, etc. The suggestion was to try and focus on the strands linking events rather than the events themselves, so that through a series of events, the links connecting them could be where concentration is placed, leading to some kind of recollection of TWTG.

I explained my proposal to the artists to produce this series of interconnected events. This allowed for an anonymous collaborative discussion between the artists, with the curator acting as facilitator through the entire process.

Questions were sent by the facilitator curator to each expert artists. The artists would respond, then the facilitator would collate, edit and send the experts the condensed answers along with new questions relating. This process was repeated until the events could be forecasted. The process of using The Delphi Method allowed the artists to incrementally refine their ideas for Event Show , which lead to 5 separate actions as part of one overall event, which happened on 3 June.

The Press release read as follows:. What makes it unique both locally and internationally? We try to fulfill this desire. Moreover, I think that the Museum is quite a unique place, for some very specific reasons.

The collection and the exhibition spaces are in a Renaissance church, which was renovated in by the great Leon Battista Alberti. In the last two centuries the building had changed several times its identity: Afterwards for a very long time it was an army deposit, until its final destination: The artist decided to ask two of his close friends, whose master had been the famous architect Giovanni Michelucci, to think about the renovation of the building and they made a very special project with brutalist roots and references to Albini, Scarpa and Michelucci.

A few years ago I decided to start the restoration of the Rucellai Chapel by Leon Battista Alberti, a great masterpiece of the Italian Renaissance, that originally was part of the church. In the 19th century the passage between the Chapel and the church had been closed, and I decided to re-open it and connect it again to the museum.

It seems to me that now the museum is a kind of time machine: The second reason that makes the museum unique is that we invest all our budget in production, production, production. How do you articulate contemporary creations and emerging art with the work of Marino Marini, who could be defined as a modern sculptor?

The exhibitions and the joint programmes dedicated to performance, music, dance, cinema, and literature are related to sculpture and to its transformations from the legacy of Marino Marini — both archaic and modernist — to the new generations of artists.

Marino Marini is a truly representative modern sculptor. Why including a programme of contemporary art in a museum —and one could also say in a city— which is dedicated to the research and conservation of a specific heritage? As we live in a city with a glorious past, whose artistic achievements have been so influential in the Western world, we have decided to operate in the present, counting on a heritage which is almost unique in its richness.

We mean to address the citizens of Florence and its metropolitan area, who participate in this heritage while needing to live in dialogue with the present time.

We are one of the few institutions in Florence that focuses its activity on the local community. The dialogue with our everyday present is the key focus of our work. PIANO intends to create a network of art spaces working together, exchanging and interacting. Why did you decide to join the project and how are you participating in it? We have decided to participate in PIANO because sharing ideas and projects with other countries stimulates cultural and artistic growth.

That is why we thought of profiting of this opportunity in the best possible way. Our experience about the project Alfred Jarry Archipelago is giving excellent results and the French Institutions, even those that are active in Italy, have worked with us and they have offered a great collaboration. Museo Marino Marini Protagonists: Alberto Salvadori, Leonardo Bigazzi. Che cosa lo rende unico a livello locale e internazionale? Il nostro obiettivo è realizzare questo desiderio. Penso che il museo sia un luogo unico per diverse ragioni.

In seguito, per un lungo periodo di tempo, il sito fu usato come deposito di armi, fino alla sua destinazione finale, quella di sede del Museo Marino Marini. Il risultato fu un progetto molto particolare con radici brutaliste e riferimenti ad Albini, Scarpa e Michelucci. Alcuni anni fa ho deciso di avviare il restauro della Cappella Rucellai di Leon Battista Alberti, un grande capolavoro del Rinascimento italiano, originariamente parte integrante della chiesa. Il passaggio tra la cappella e la chiesa, chiuso nel XIX secolo, è stato riaperto e collegato nuovamente agli spazi del museo.

Ora il museo è una sorta di macchina del tempo: Il secondo elemento che rende il museo unico è la nostra scelta di investire tutto il nostro budget in produzione, produzione, produzione. Marino Marini è una figura chiave della scultura moderna. Desideriamo rivolgerci ai cittadini di Firenze e della sua area metropolitana, che fanno parte di questa eredità e hanno allo stesso tempo il bisogno di vivere in dialogo con il presente.

Siamo una delle poche istituzioni della città che concentra la propria attività sulla comunità locale. Il dialogo con il nostro presente e la nostra quotidianità è la chiave del lavoro che svolgiamo. Per quale motivo hai deciso di prendere parte al progetto e come si realizza la tua partecipazione? Abbiamo deciso di prendere parte al programma PIANO perché la condivisione delle idee e dei progetti con altri Paesi stimola la crescita culturale e artistica. È per questo che abbiamo deciso di approfittare di questa opportunità nel miglior modo possibile.

La nostra esperienza con il progetto Alfred Jarry Archipelago sta dando eccellenti risultati e le istituzioni francesi, anche quelle attive in Italia, hanno lavorato con noi offrendo grande collaborazione. Overview of the ground floor 3. Andrea Baccin When did the collaboration between you and Mark Manders begin, and why did you decide to start a publishing house?

Roger Willems We worked together for the first time in After that we started Roma Publications. We enjoyed making books independently and made our living with our other work. Over the years it slowly took over my practice and I hardly do commissioned work anymore. What is your approach to making a book? What are your selection criteria and what is the mission of Roma Publications?

Often new books are connected to previous ones, with artists we worked with before. Besides that we choose intuitively and try not to do too many things. Our goal is to keep it close to ourselves and grow steady by going on for many years. Not by making more books per year. What is the relationship between the book and the exhibition space? What is the relationship between exhibiting the book as an object and actually reading it? Most of the time books travel alone and end up in an endless amount of different contexts.

Like a family reunion. We are tiny and unskilled in what most professional publishers do such as distribution, but in the few years it has existed, it does create a sense of a group of people and interests. What makes your publishing house different from the others? We are busy with other questions than to try and be different. Each publication seems to be a nice opportunity to try something. On a practical level the production money comes from different channels than sales so it frees us from a certain pressure other structures could have.

Do you publish self-productions or books on commission? Both, it is increasingly difficult to make a difference between the two, especially when we also design books elsewhere for other publishing companies or commissioners.

What is your view on exhibiting a book in an exhibition space versus reading it? The journey to find it was as exciting as reading it. What is your approach to graphics in your projects, and what are the criteria in selecting the books you publish?

There is a form of authorial translation but we suspect the whole thing is to broaden friendship… which leads to thinking that most people we have published are friends or have become one. Keren Detton Le Quartier was founded in on the initiative of the former director of the Quimper art school, Michel Pagnoux.

Its underpinnings were the intense competition in art, literature and film in Quimper and the implementation of the decentralisation policies initiated by Jack Lange in the mids. Le Quartier was set up in the same building as the art school but operated autonomously, enabling it to be part of a professional network to which students had special access. Subsequently, the implementation of a contract with the state, region and department guaranteed that it would be possible to work with the public in a sustained way, particularly through the assistance they provided for the production of works and for mediation activities.

Charles Esche described his ideal museum as fundamentally uncertain: The idea was to shake up the annual programme, introduce different rhythms, play on synchronic or diachronic effects, while preserving an artistic research space over the long term and continuing to do creative work with publications catalogues, anthologies of texts, artist books. I also wanted to work on the porosity between the inside and outside in order to shatter the military aspect of this former barracks and highlight the seeing conditions.

It was as if visitors were both surprised and relieved to see the works integrated into their day-to-day life. Recently, artist and architect Catherine Rannou offered a visit to the worksite of an exhibition setup tackling architecture through language and imagination, radically transforming the institution. I find it very stimulating when works speak to visitors on the level of their relationship to the body and to language. Le Quartier will be celebrating its 25th anniversary in a shaken political, economic and media context.

As we speak, Le Quartier is being threatened by drastic budget cuts, and yet its balance sheet has been unanimously praised by all of its public partners. It runs an untimely programme alongside artists, investigates our visual cultures through images and language, and merrily crosses the boundaries between disciplines. Yet it is being told to justify its legitimacy. Le Quartier is in a prime position between the art school, to which it offers genuine professional springboards, and the fine art museum, with which it collaborates regularly.

But above all it is a place of emerging forms and ideas, passions and questions. It is rooted in its territory and resonates with places elsewhere, and keeps up a dialogue with artists and visitors. Why did you wish to participate and what programme are you proposing? Alfred Jarry Archipelago was born of the desire to understand artistic creation today through Alfred Jarry, the father of pataphysics. The project has turned into an open curatorial platform, which apprehends the legacy of the author of Ubu Roi not historically but speculatively.

Since he was a well-informed observer of the artists of his time, we decided to make way for Alfred Jarry the curator! Leonardo Bigazzi, curator at the Museo Marino Marini in Florence, is presenting a programme of performances. Eva Wittocx, curator at M — Museum and for the Playground Festival in Leuven Belgium is joining us by linking monographic exhibitions and performances. The project framework is open enough to incorporate different points of view on this subversive figure full of contrasts, and to more closely examine his relationship to theatre, his projection of bodies and desire, his use of codes and absurdity, and the mixing of genres and identities.

A publication in the form of an almanac will be the receptacle of this multiplicity of perspectives, with supplements provided by new contributors, authors and artists. Charles Esche a décrit son musée idéal comme étant fondamentalement incertain: Je voulais aussi travailler sur la porosité entre le dedans et le dehors pour casser le côté militaire de cette ancienne caserne et mettre en exergue les conditions du regard. Le Quartier fêtera ses 25 ans cette année dans un contexte politique, économique et médiatique bouleversé.

Pourtant, on le somme de justifier sa légitimité. Par ailleurs, Eva Wittocx, curatrice au Museum M et pour le Playground Festival à Louvain Belgique nous a rejoints en associant des expositions monographiques et des performances.

Dorothée Dupuis Could you talk about your formal influences? What do you look at? How do you think? How has your training as a designer informed how you produce forms in the exhibition sphere? It seems that the language of abstraction is still important for you. Clémence Seilles I regularly go back and see images by my classical masters: Primordial shapes like circles, triangles, squares… enable me to concentrate more on narratives, circumstances and processes.

I proceed from what societies tangibly produce to build themselves. I visit companies dealing in supplies or construction equipment, and go to rendering plants and product assembly factories. I idly drive through industrial estates in Italy, France, Germany and Holland.

On YouTube I watch guitar swirling in garages and industrial plastic machining. In this context, the work is at once an everyday object and something fantastical: Although my training as a designer informs manipulations of conventions much more than manipulations of shapes , the exhibition sphere, which is not very familiar with functional services and devices, opens up a fertile field of experiments that are more complicated to develop in the commercial sphere.

Are you more of a Fassbinder, Wako or Beverly Hills ? A gang can be Philip K. Cain , alone and condemned. I try to combine sustainable economic efficiency with the risk of alienation.

The gang — made up of artists, designers, composers, curators and architects who are all fanatical about hard beats — lives between Berlin, Amsterdam and Paris, and is heterogeneous and multifarious. The action hierarchies are healthy, made of individuals who do their singular research and can take turns implementing or supporting a project.

PostNorma, a fabulous squat conquered and dissolved in one year, which generated workshops and various events. The Dirty Art department, an institutional bouillabaisse that made lots of meetings and journeys possible.

SANKS, a design company among friends. Cicciolinas, unifying techno parties. What is you position in all of this relative to institutions and the art market? My artistic commitment is romantic. It is to create an optimal climate for creativity, establishing circumstances that produce autonomous strengths and attitudes without excluding myself from society — quite the opposite.

I practice lateral thinking and oblique strategies. Each card contains a cryptic phrase or comment to meditate on, one that can be used to overcome a creative block or dilemma. It is based on imagination and on putting forward impossible, absurd, unrealistic theories in order to create springboards towards other ideas that are themselves achievable. Embodied in my practice, this means that I go off into fairly diverse application areas and development structures, working with people who are also very different and sometimes have polar opposite ways of thinking.

This makes it more tiring and difficult to exist in different markets instead of only one, since people still have a strong tendency less in English-speaking countries to recognise only a single profession for each person.

Exhibition as Research Space: Dorothée Dupuis Peux-tu me parler de tes influences formelles? Clémence Seilles Je vais régulièrement revoir des images de mes maîtres classiques: Les formes primordiales telles cercles, triangles, carrés… me permettent de me concentrer davantage sur les narrations, les circonstances et les procédés.

Je pars de ce que les sociétés produisent de tangible pour se construire. Une bande, ça peut être Philip K. Cain , seul et condamné. PostNorma, un squat fabuleux conquis et dissout en une année, qui généra workshops et évènements divers.

Le département Dirty Art, bouillabaisse institutionnelle qui permit beaucoup de rencontres et de voyages. SANKS, une compagnie de design entre amis. Les Cicciolinas, fêtes technos fédératrices. Je pratique pensées latérales et stratégies obliques. Les stratégies obliques est un set de cartes inventées par Brian Eno et Peter Schmidt en Exhibition views, Clémence Seilles, Bassin ouvert.

It therefore grew out of the need to create a kind of institution that was lacking here in Milan, and to experiment with this kind of hybrid structure. So one of the first thing spurring us on was the desire to examine what the role and future of the art institution could be today.

Everything that is not strictly necessary to the work and its presentation — which is the purpose of a show — is a superstructure. In the dialogue with the artist, which is a fundamental part of constructing any exhibition, the positions, thoughts, and needs of the curator should never prevail over or obscure those of the artist and of the work. All the exhibitions organized by Peep-Hole are developed in this spirit: The name itself is an answer to your question.

A peep-hole has a fisheye lens that allows a wide field of vision without being visible from outside. Whatare the main challenges for a space that wants to remain independent?

PIANO is aimed at creating a network of art spaces that work together, exchanging ideas and interacting with each other. The program Six Ways to Sunday , which consists in inviting an institution to do a show in our space as if it were a satellite project room, is one example.

The project we are participating with, The Book Society 02 , in collaboration with the Synagogue de Delme, is devoted to the most experimental forms of publishing, and intends to investigate the potential of the book as a form of expression.

Publishing is indeed a space in which not only is something conveyed, but content is created. Nowadays many well-established or newly founded independent publishers and countless text-based artistic practices have accelerated the development of this format as one of the most interesting phenomena on the current art scene.

The book society Vincent Honoré Quando avete dato vita a Peep-Hole e cosa vi ha spinto ad aprire questo spazio a Milano? Tutte le mostre organizzate da Peep-Hole sono sviluppate secondo questa idea: Lo stesso nome dello spazio fornisce una risposta alla tua domanda. Quali sono le sfide maggiori per uno spazio che ambisce a rimanere indipendente? Tuttavia gli spazi di quel periodo erano vere alternative ai contesti istituzionali e alla loro legittimazione ufficiale del valore artistico.

Oggi le cose sono cambiate, le istituzioni si sono trasformate divenendo più flessibili, più aperte al dialogo, per cui gli spazi come il nostro in realtà non sono tanto alternative quanto derivazioni di esse. Per quale motivo avete deciso di prendere parte al progetto e come si realizza la vostra partecipazione? Il progetto con cui partecipiamo, The Book Society 02 , in collaborazione con la Synagogue de Delme, è dedicato alle forme più sperimentali di produzione in ambito editoriale e mira a investigare il potenziale del libro come forma di espressione.

Per Book Society 02 abbiamo trasformato lo spazio di Peep-Hole in una reading room in cui sono presentate le pubblicazioni di alcune delle case editrici europee più interessanti. Adriano Costa, How to be Invisible in High Heels , , concrete, sand, red soil, iron, 50 x 5 cm, variable heights. Installation view at Peep-Hole, Milan, Courtesy: They are the product of relationships between many agents — artist s , curator s , artwork s , audience s , display, etc.

An exhibition is a designed situation, still open to a lot of various uncontrollable factors, time being the first of those; so I am interested in practices that are aware of how this time can be administered and shared among all those who are part of the exhibition, primarily the audience.

Nikolaus Hirsch asked this question: Various people, mainly from the field of art and architecture, curated and organized exhibitions and activities of different kinds with a quite intense rhythm up to twelve exhibitions a year. And I am doing this by inviting artists, designers, choreographers, theorists, etc. The mission of your institution is to produce and present regional, national and international artistic practices and to conduct critical research on the role of art and its relationship with the social and political sphere within which it operates.

I would like to ask you what you think is the core responsibility of the institution nowadays, with regard to the artists and the audience. And I guess this is possible just by administering resources first of all, time, as the most precious one in a savvy way. It is a process that takes time, but some good steps have been made in this direction. We also discussed this topic at a conference at Bétonsalon on 30 May with the Italian collective Invernomuto and the French curator Rémi Parcollet.

Esse sono il risultato di relazioni tra diversi attori — artisti, curatori, opere, pubblico, display ecc. Sono tutti aspetti che fanno della mostra un medium specifico finalizzato a creare qualcosa di pubblico. Una mostra è una situazione progettata, che rimane tuttavia aperta a diversi fattori incontrollabili, il primo dei quali è il tempo. Nikolaus Hirsch si poneva la seguente domanda: Sto quindi portando avanti tale riflessione attraverso il coinvolgimento di artisti, designer, coreografi, teorici ecc.

Credo sia molto importante — quale segno di rispetto verso gli artisti e il pubblico — trovare il modo di mediare le pratiche degli artisti a beneficio del contesto locale in cui operiamo. Ovviamente è molto importante evitare il rischio di una mentalità troppo ristretta, cosa che tentiamo di fare presentando pratiche e approcci che siano critici e capaci di produrre legami e connessioni tra temi locali e idee più ampie.

Sin da quando sonoarrivato a Bolzano ho cercato di attivare una serie di collaborazioni e coproduzioni a livello locale, nazionale e internazionale. È un processo che richiede tempo, ma abbiamo compiuto importanti passi in questa direzione.

Abbiamo inoltre discusso questo tema in occasione della conferenza tenutasi presso Bétonsalon lo scorso 30 maggio, cui hanno partecipato il collettivo italiano Invernomuto e il curatore francese Rémi Parcollet. Constellation of One and Many , The realisation of this arrangement, in its form and duration, can be limited by other museum activities requiring that the shutters be opened. The work and the exhibition have a specific relation to the Bolzano context.

Bernhard Rüdiger I spend a lot of time in that region, and I was aware of various aspects of the context of history shared between Austria and Italy. The land in these Tyrolean valleys was feudal, whereas the peasants in the mountains were independent.

Looking at the valley from the mountaintops, you see something completely different from what you see from the opposite direction. The view from the 4th floor of Museion offered a symbolic top-down point of view.

The museum is built on the boundary that is the river. This already emphasised that kind of point of passage, but from the opposite point of view. This reversal of perspective leads us to the one carried out at Museion. The exhibition highlights the fact that the museum builds this same passage from Italy to Austria and vice versa. The invitation was probably linked to the fact that my work is often built on a context, in this case the museum and its layout.

Since the exhibition had a strong link to the city, I felt that my proposal would be weak if it only addressed institutional aspects. By extending the invitation to Bernhard and his work linked to the notion of space, the point was to enrich the project through the historical and topographical perspectives it could provide. How did these questions of passage and perspective-reversal affect your proposal?

The exhibition offered a reversal of the function of the museum spaces; the viewer had to enter the exhibition directly on the ground floor, which is normally a passage, and then view the city from the 4th floor, which had been turned into a belvedere, in order to finally go back downstairs and follow the suggested route through the city.

Our proposal found its place in that belvedere. We were unsure if when viewers reached a practically empty room on the top floor, facing large windows, they would intuitively be able to experience looking at the city.

The gesture of opening the museum onto that broad landscape could seem romantic: Whereas visiting the exhibition on the ground floor was preparation for looking at the city from the belvedere? It was a matter of constructing a determined perspective instead of a passive contemplation, as well as introducing the question of the body and the notion of unstable balance: The final proposal was to close some of the shutters on either side of the building and therefore either side of the city to create a specific field of vision that involved a movement dynamic and spatialized the bodies in the space.

We did a trial during the exhibition in progress and as soon as the shutters were closed, people stopped looking at the works to approach the windows. What role did the model play? This metaphor in the state of language becomes a physical act as soon as you experiment with it.

The exhibition brought forward the notion of architectural filter. There is a certain equivalence of preoccupations and ways of filtering the gaze. The two works operate in opposite ways, but actually express something very similar.

Another work in the exhibition, that of Marcus Geiger, consisted in extracting one of the apartments from a housing project, an empty space that ultimately offers a transversal perspective, enabling reflection upon architecture and town planning. It sports these two eyes that look outside, a two-faced gaze in the shape of a Janus head, something that is very characteristics of the local culture. Speaking of local culture, can we discuss the title?

Thinking again of the belvedere, is the title therefore a clue about how to use the work? The third word is in the Tyrolean dialect and expresses the idea of looking past appearances to understand reality.

At the same time, people only understand a third of the title, since each of these languages is only spoken by some of the population. It reconsiders questions about the activation of perspective, which are important for Bernhard, through my own methods, including the production of a condition of incisiveness when regarding what is already present on-site, without adding objects. The desire not to add objects seems to me to be very apt — since the museum itself is already an object, and not a transparent, neutral tool.

Émile Ouroumov Pourriez-vous me décrire votre intervention pour Soleil politique au Museion de Bolzano? La réalisation de ce dispositif, dans sa forme et dans sa durée, peut être limitée par les autres activités du musée qui imposeraient que des volets soient ouverts.

Vous connaissiez cette région, la ville et les édifices mis en exergue par le projet de Pierre Bal-Blanc? Les terres dans ces vallées du Tyrol étaient féodales, alors que dans les hauteurs les paysans étaient indépendants. Il est aussi question de la situation du Museion au milieu de la ville, entre la ville historique autrichienne et la ville nouvelle italianisée? Cette dernière soulignait déjà un tel point de passage mais avec le point de vue inverse.

Cette inversion du regard nous conduit vers celle opérée au Museion. Notre proposition prenait place dans ce belvédère. Il nous a semblé que cette impression est le contraire de la prise de conscience politique de ce qui se passe au pied du spectateur dans la ville. Quel est le rôle de la maquette? Les billes au centre sont une expérience de cette stabilité violente qui traduit les spécificités historiques et sociales de la région. Je pense par exemple à Gianni Pettena et à son intervention liée aux arcades fascistes de la Piazza della Vittoria.

Il y a une certaine équivalence des préoccupations et de la manière de filtrer le regard. Il y a ici un acte similaire qui fait traverser la structure par le regard. En parlant de la culture locale, peut-on évoquer le titre? Il est rédigé dans trois langues pratiquées dans la région. Elle est le résultat de nos deux pratiques, un territoire construit à partir de notre expérience commune.

Vincent Honoré What prefigured the creation of Bétonsalon in Paris? Is there a precedent or theoretical model for the space?

Mélanie Bouteloup Bétonsalon was born in from the assembling of a group that included artists from the École des Beaux-Arts de Paris and art historians, especially from the École du Louvre. We came together around the shared view that Paris lacked places that were midway between art school and institution, places where it was possible to test ideas, make mistakes and show the work of unestablished artists, whether they were still students or were older but unrecognised.

How does Bétonsalon fit into its environment, and how is it different from other spaces in Paris? Today the Bétonsalon Centre for Art and Research is located in the 13th arrondissement in Paris, on the ground floor of Paris 7 University.

It is one of the few independent art centres located on a university campus in France. Because of this, we enjoy a special relationship with the Ministry of education and we are developing a programme that questions standardised forms of knowledge production, classification and distribution.

I think art centres have a role to play, supporting art research and rearticulating the position of education, research and creativity in society. As the years and meetings have passed, the organisation has become more professional and its ambitions have asserted themselves. The opening of the Centre for art and research in was a key moment. At that time we met many university researchers and students whom we gradually got to know well.

Today the programming is conceived according to various formats and timeframes, and includes several annual exhibitions interspersed with associated events. Different seminars and workshops are also organised in collaboration with professors from Paris Diderot University. How might one conceive of the possibility of spaces for independent programming in the face of accelerated globalisation, a ubiquitous art market and the hitting power of the largest institutions?

I think flexible, small-scale organisations like Bétonsalon are needed to preserve this possibility of experimenting with ways of working that involve direct dialogue, even joint construction, with other non-profit organisations. Faced with this crisis situation, there is an urgent need to reconsider how we do things. Cross-disciplinary navigation tactics need to be invented. This could be done as soon as renewed conception of the territory of art could be agreed: An art centre should make the social and cultural frictions of the present perceptible.

Exhibition view, Maryam Jafri. Under these conditions, what are the responsibilities of the director of an art centre? The responsibility of the whole staff of an art centre is therefore enormous. We have to challenge ourselves, working as closely as possible with the region by maintaining a network of relationships that should be broadened day by day to increase the number of collaborations.

Why did you want to join this project and what will you be presenting? It is a reflection on how history is written. Therefore it is crucial to be able to hear voices other than the official ones, hence the invitation extended to the Italian collective Invernomuto to come and contribute to the exhibition. Nous avons alors rencontré de nombreux chercheurs et étudiants du milieu universitaire avec lesquels nous nous sommes peu à peu familiarisés.

Face à cette situation de crise, il est urgent de repenser nos manières de faire. Des tactiques de navigation transversale doivent être inventées. Exhibition views, Maryam Jafri.

In the presence of Maryam Jafri artist. An afternoon of visual and theoretical essays around exhibition as a medium for research, where time allows to rethink the relations between art and the public sphere, beyond disciplinary categories. The detailed program will be announced soon. En présence de Maryam Jafri artiste. Programme détaillé à venir. In what sense was this collective dynamic important?

The three of us already knew each other. We got along well and lived in more or less the same area. Each of us having been separately involved in several collaborations, we were aware that this presented an advantage in terms of energy, labour power and letting go.

Beyond the spirit of intellectual competition, one senses that this collective logic is also efficient when it comes to production. At the work-creation stage, a distinctive organisational logic can already be discerned… D. This is something that creeps into our practices and into those of quite a few artists of our generation. Primarily out of pure pragmatism: By inventing our tools, by making do with whatever we have at our disposal.

What is the meaning of the title Jambe de botte? For the creation of this piece, you tested several types of material, ultimately choosing plastic from melted garden chairs. Why did this material stand out? This brings us back to production circuits and pragmatism. How a combination of gestures can produce an image. We very empirically tested hundreds of combinations. Then we took a deckchair, burned it with a flamethrower, and the result was perfect.

We work on the French Riviera, where the dumps are full of this kind of furniture. We were conscious of reflecting the dystopian faults of this strange place that, when you remove the glamour of the sun and palm trees, smells of cheap suntan lotion, melted poodles and social violence. How were the forms of the different sculptures created?

We aligned casts found in an abandoned train parts foundry, in such a way that we were able to create cylinders that could be spun like record players. We poured the plastic and suddenly we had Scud missiles. Since sound is a vibration, in principle it can be inscribed on the media it comes into contact with. The forms of the various sculptures evoke something of a warlike world. Added to these forms is a sound that gives the space a stressful atmosphere.

How is this sound produced? Then everything developed very spontaneously. The day before the exhibition opened, we had to make up our minds to bring the sculptures into the exhibition venue. Although object and device diversion and DIY are found in your respective works, I get the impression that the question of sculpture is fairly new. We considered simple questions that are not at all historical. A plinth is practical. It keeps the work at a distance and prevents a Scud from falling on someone.

Plastic is more solid than margarine, etc. Ici, vous faites une proposition de production partagée. En quoi cette dynamique collective a-t-elle été importante? Tous les trois, nous nous connaissions déjà, nous nous entendions bien et nous vivions plus ou moins au même endroit. Pour la réalisation de cette pièce, vous avez testé plusieurs types de matériaux, pour au final vous arrêter sur du plastique provenant de chaises de jardin fondues.

On en revient aux circuits de productions et au pragmatisme. Nous avons testé de manière très empirique des centaines de combinaisons. Nous avions conscience de renvoyer les travers dystopiques de cet étrange endroit qui, dégagé du côté glamour du soleil et des palmiers, sent la crème solaire bon marché, le caniche fondu et la violence sociale. Comment les formes des différentes sculptures ont-elles été créées?

Comment se son est-il produit? Please could you describe the work and what is specific to this iteration in Paris? Maryam Jafri The photo series Independence Day consists of archival photographs mainly from the first independence days of various Asian, Middle Eastern, and African countries. A key concept of the work is that the images come from archives, usually official archives, located in the countries themselves. In its current iteration at Bétonsalon, I have sixty images from twenty-nine archives.

A great deal of artistic and academic research has been done on both the colonial and post-colonial eras but my project looks specifically at that moment of transformation — that twenty-four hour period during which a set of rituals, ceremonies and speeches herald the transformation of a territory into a nation state. When Mélanie Bouteloup the director of Bétonsalon approached me to show the work in Paris, she asked if I was interested in giving the research behind the work a visible form within the exhibition space.

Hence along with the wall-based photo series, I have also conceived, in dialogue with Bétonsalon and designer Hadrien Gerenton, an architectural display system made up of various research modules that give different views into the process and ideas related to Independence Day For example, some modules contain personal contributions by historians and others who helped me in my research such as Helihanta Rajaonarison, a historian from Madagascar, and Franck Ogou, archives manager at École du Patromoine Africain in Benin.

We also have some modules in the space which are the result of workshops by students who responded or in some way related to the themes of Independence Day ,since Bétonsalon is located on the campus of University Paris Diderot and collaborations with the students and scholars from the university are an important aspect of its programme.

I have the impression that the workis more about dependence than independence, as it highlights the similarities between the political aesthetics adopted by newly independent nations and those of former colonial powers that, more often than not, had a coercive hand in the independence process.

These rituals and ceremonies are Western in origin as would be expected since they are bound up with the nation state, but what makes the images in Independence Day so unsettling is that the displacement from centre to periphery results in a hybridization of those political aesthetics as it comes into contact with local traditions and histories.

Thus the images look both familiar and estranged — a repetition with a difference. To what extent does this inform how the work is presented? In this piece form and content cannot be easily separated. The content is the form and the form is the content. At first glance one sees a typology, a strategy long associated with photography from Aby Warburg to the photo-conceptualists.

But what is it that the photos in Independence Day actually reveal? What about questions of access and copyright? How key are these issues to your thinking? When I first started this work a lot of people were surprised by my decision to bypass Western archives and look for the images in the countries themselves. I was interested in seeing how each country was preserving images of itself coming into being. Furthermore, at a time when most people, including myself, get their visual information from Google, I felt it important to render visible these archives, official but often unknown even within the countries themselves.

Actors in the region need to join forces to provide the public with dynamically open access to culture. We wish to offer a place that establishes circulations between visual arts, architecture, urbanism, and economic and social life. Art and culture can be very powerful levers of communal life.

These have the ability to bring meaning, desire and community to social developments that are all too often merely endured. In fact, developing this centre means believing in utopia as a development value, since today art is one of the best forms of shared expression.

It seems increasingly difficult to operate small, often isolated centres in France. This raises the question of their validity in a region that may not be conducive to contemporary art.

Does the question also arise of the utopian nature or obsolescence of regional divisions and the dissemination of contemporary art? Or the lack of public will? The centre operates on a budget of , euros, including salaries. The project is therefore difficult to manage. Despite all of these problems, we were able to develop a project policy directed at the region. Our partners are numerous and varied.

Its activities have genuine legitimacy. They only come to exhibition openings and they often have electioneering aims. On the other hand, the visitors we meet are happy to have this place in their lives, offering something different in a rural area. Giving ourselves the possibility of creating a breeding ground means engaging in discourse that is situated on the level of economics and regional development. Utopia comes into play in our programming and mediation.

The work aimed at the public is essential for making people aware that a programme is first and foremost a little utopia factory. We should be political actors of this public will. As director, how do you articulate your programme? What are the highlights of ? Even though our programming alternates between young, emerging and recognised artists from the French scene, we are still primarily focused on supporting young artists.

The place needs to be taken into account, in its entirety and through its architecture, a 17th century chapel. The programming aims to bring out its narrative density, seen as a plinth for the project.

Because we must continue to advance and help contemporary art to be a maker of utopias and ideas. Collaborating on PIANO means working in a network and sharing ideas, testing new ways of working, experimenting with the unknown. Il semble de plus en plus difficile de faire fonctionner en France des structures petites, souvent isolées. Le projet est donc assez difficile à mener. Les partenariats sont nombreux et diversifiés. Les élus ne représentent pas le public, ils ne se déplacent que pour les vernissages et leurs visées sont souvent électoralistes.

Nous devons être acteurs politiques de cette volonté publique. Comment en tant que directrice articulez-vous votre programme? Quels sont les temps forts de ? Comme déjà évoqué, nous avons un rôle citoyen, nous avons ce rôle de pédagogue pour faire comprendre, entraîner et continuer pour les artistes, pour le public. Pourquoi était-ce important de collaborer et quel est le projet que vous allez présenter? Vincent Honoré Can you introduce Careof, its history, missions and programmes?

Chiara Agnello Since Careof fosters the development of contemporary art practice with passion, creativity and expertise. Since then, Careof is a place where young and established artists can be inspired, exchange views and be encouraged to experiment, debate and grow. Since Careof is located at Fabbrica del Vapore in Milan, an industrial building from the early 20th century, which was originally meant for the construction, maintenance and sale of railway and tram material, and today is a youthful centre of cultural production.

Foster the development of artistic work, research and education is still one of our goals in conjunction with becoming a reference point for videoart in Italy and abroad.

Careof has various spaces and resources: Within a no profit organization as Careof the word experimentation is closely related to the continuous questioning of the organizational processes and the ability to be flexible in the face of opportunity, to changes in society and of the public we work with.

Obviously we have a well-defined mission, but the goals that we set are a response to the reading of our context. They can then change and evolve with time. How do you foresee the future of an institution like yours in a context in which globalised museums and institutions become such powerful players, absorbing all energies, audiences and funding?

Careof is characterized by the ability to read the context and be an active part of the community we refer. We have the ability to observe the artistic practices in their multifaceted and multiform varieties, giving space also to the emerging ones. We have the capacity to act with different strategies, giving space to the experimentation in a time which research and development are becoming less valued.

For these reasons we believe that institutions like ours must continue to exist alongside the powerful players. What is your mission with archive and archiving and how does it differ from collecting? The video archive includes over 7, pieces and is the most important collection of videoart in Italy.

The catalogue holds over 6, artworks, from the first experiments made in the 70s to work by the latest generations, and about 1, videos documenting exhibitions, conferences, performances and art events of international relevance. The collection is an important resource to understand the development of contemporary art research over the past 40 years and specifically in Italy. Through the video archive we develop exhibitions, residency and research projects. We are archiving in order to support the artists and their work, share and pass on the knowledge and let everyone know the contemporary art scene.

This is probably the main difference from collecting. Inside the mission of Careof there is the vocation to work with Italian and international institutions as we believe that through the exchange between cultures and people we can generate an enrichment.

We then responded to Stefania Meazza, curator of the project Piano — Alto! The project has provided for young Italian and French artists a period of residence at the centers involved: There have been several meetings between us to investigate the practices and activities of each organization.

The choice of artists was facilitated by a pre-selection made by the institutions, offering a list of candidates to others. The selected artists are: Vincent Honoré Puoi presentare Careof, la sua storia, la sua mission e il suo programma?

Chiara Agnello Dal Careofpromuove lo sviluppo della pratica artistica contemporanea con passione, creatività e competenza. Sin dalla sua nascita, Careof è un luogo in cui artisti giovani e riconosciuti possono trarre ispirazione, scambiare le proprie visioni e trovare stimolo per sperimentare, discutere e crescere. Oggi è un centro per la produzione culturale.

Careof ha diversi spazi e risorse: Essi possono quindi cambiare ed evolvere nel tempo. Siamo in grado di osservare le pratiche artistiche nelle loro sfaccettate e multiformi declinazioni, dando spazio ai fenomeni emergenti. Sappiamo agire attraverso diverse strategie, mettendo in primo piano la sperimentazione in un momento in cui la ricerca e lo sviluppo sono sempre meno valorizzati.

Per queste ragioni crediamo che le istituzioni come la nostra debbano continuare a esistere accanto alle realtà più influenti. Il catalogo comprende più di 6.

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